Current Issue

 

Share

Search
BeisMoshiach.org
Web
Tags
#1000 #1001 #1002 #1003 #1004 #1005 #1006 #1007 #1008 #1009 #1010 #1011 #1012 #1013 #1014 #1015 #1016 #1017 #1018 #1019 #1020 #1021 #1022 #1023 #1024 #1025 #1026 #1027 #1028 #1029 #1030 #1031 #1032 #1033 #1034 #1035 #1036 #1037 #1038 #1039 #1040 #1041 #1042 #1043 #1044 #1045 #1046 #1047 #1048 #1049 #1050 #1051 #1052 #1053 #1054 #1055 #1056 #1057 #1058 #1059 #1060 #1061 #1062 #1063 #1064 #1065 #1066 #1067 #1068 #1069 #1070 #1071 #1072 #1073 #1074 #1075 #1076 #1077 #1078 #1079 #1080 #1081 #1082 #1083 #1084 #1085 #1086 #1088 #1089 #1090 #1091 #1092 #1093 #1094 #318 #319 #350 #383 #390 #550 #560 #594 #629 #642 #776 #777 #778 #779 #780 #781 #782 #783 #784 #785 #786 #787 #820 #823 #824 #825 #826 #827 #828 #829 #830 #831 #832 #833 #834 #835 #836 #837 #838 #839 #840 #841 #842 #843 #844 #845 #846 #847 #848 #849 #850 #851 #852 #853 #854 #855 #856 #857 #858 #859 #860 #861 #862 #863 #864 #865 #866 #867 #868 #869 #870 #871 #872 #873 #874 #875 #876 #876 #877 #878 #879 #880 #881 #882 #883 #884 #885 #886 #887 #888 #889 #890 #891 #892 #893 #894 #895 #896 #897 #898 #899 #900 #901 #902 #903 #904 #905 #906 #907 #908 #909 #910 #911 #912 #913 #914 #915 #916 #917 #918 #919 #920 #921 #922 #923 #924 #925 #926 #927 #928 #929 #930 #931 #932 #933 #934 #935 #936 #937 #938 #939 #940 #941 #942 #943 #944 #945 #946 #947 #948 #949 #950 #951 #952 #953 #954 #955 #956 #957 #958 #959 #960 #961 #962 #963 #964 #965 #966 #967 #968 #969 #970 #971 #972 #973 #974 #975 #976 #977 #978 #979 #980 #981 #982 #983 #984 #985 #986 #987 #988 #989 #990 #991 #992 #993 #994 #995 #996 #997 #998 #999 1 Kislev 10 Kislev 10 Shvat 10 Shvat 10 Teives 11 11 Nissan 112 Tammuz 119 Kislev 12 Tammuz 13 Iyar 13 Tishrei 14 Kislev 15 Elul 15 Menachem-Av 15 Shvat 17 Tammuz 18 Elul 19 Kislev 2 Iyar 20 Av 20 Mar-Cheshvan 20 Menachem-Av 20 Teives 22 Shvat 24 Teives 25 Adar 27 Adar 28 Nissan 28 Teives 29 Elul 3 Tammuz 33 Tammuz 352 5 Teives 6 Tishrei 7 Adar 770 864 865 881 9 Adar 9 Av 9 Kislev 903 Acharei-K'doshim Achdus Adar Ahavas Yisroel Alef-Beis Alter Rebbe Amalek Argentina Arizal army Artwork Aseres HaDibros Australia Avoda Zara B’Chukosai B’Shalach Baal Shem Tov baal t'shuva Balak BaMidbar bar mitzva Basi L'Gani B'Chukosai be Bein HaMeitzarim Beis HaMikdash Beis Nissan Beth Rivkah B'Haalos'cha B'Har B'Har-B'Chukosai Birthday Bitachon Bo B'rachos Brazil brit milah Brussels B'Shalach chai v'kayam Chanuka Chassidic Rabbis Chayei Sara Chevron children chinuch Chitas Choshen Chukas Churban controversy convert Dan Diary of the late R’ Saadya Maatuf Dollars dreams D''varim Editor's Corner Eikev Elul Emor Europe fire France free choice Gaza Gentiles Georgia Gulf War Gush Katif Haazinu Hakhel HaYom Yom Hebron hiskashrus Holy Temple Honoring Parents Hospitality IDF Igrot Kodesh India Intermarriage Internet Iran Iron Curtain Israel Japan Jewish Refugee Crisis Kabbala K'doshim Kfar Chabad Ki Savo Ki Seitzei Ki Sisa KIDDUSH LEVANA Kiryat Gat Kislev kKi Sisa Kohen Gadol Korach korbanos KOS SHEL BRACHA Krias Shma K'vutza Lag B'Omer lashon ha'ra Lech Lecha letter Litvishe maamer Machatzis HaShekel mahn Mar-Cheshvan marriage Massei Matot Mattos Mattos-Massei Menachem Av Metzora Mexico Miami MiKeitz MIkvah Mishkan Mishpatim Mitteler Rebbe Mitzva Tank Mitzvah Tanks Mivtza Kashrus MIvtza Neshek Mivtza T’fillin Mivtza Tefilin Morocco Moshe Rabbeinu Moshiach & Geula Moshiach Seuda music Napoleon Naso niggunim Nissan Nitzavim Nitzavim-VaYeilech Noach Noachide North Africa olive oil painting Parshas Parah parshas re'eh Parshas Zachor Pesach Pesach Sheini Pinchas Pirkei Avos P'kudei prayer Prison Purim R’ Avrohom Schneersohn Rabbi Hillel Zaltzman Rabbi Levi Yitzchok Rabbi Mordechai Eliyahu Rabbi Shlomo Galperin Rambam Ramban Rashbi Rashi Rebbe Rebbe Maharash Rebbe Rashab Rebbe Rayatz Rebbe Rayatz & Joint Rebbetzin Chana Rebbetzin Chaya Muska Red Heifer R'ei Rishon L'Tzion Rosh Chodesh Rosh HaShana Russia Samarkand seifer Torah s'firas ha'omer Shabbos Shabbos Chazon Shabbos Hagadol Shabbos Nachamu shalom bayis Shavuos Shekalim shiduchim Shlach shleimus ha'Aretz shliach shlichus Shmini Shmita Shmos Shoftim shtus Shvat simcha Simchas Torah South Africa Sukkos summer tahalucha Talmud Torah Tanya Tazria-Metzora te Tehilim Teives Terror teshuva Tetzaveh t'fillin the omer the soul tisha b'av Tishrei Toldos Tomchei T'mimim Truma t'shuva tTruma Tzanz Tzav Tzedaka Tzemach Tzedek Tzfas tzimtzum VaEira VaEs'chanan VaYakhel VaYakhel-P’kudei VaYechi VaYeilech VaYeira VaYeishev VaYeitzei VaYigash VaYikra VaYishlach Vocational Schools women Yechidus Yeshiva Yisro Yom Kippur Yom Tov Zohar Zos HaBracha. B'Reishis סיביר
Visitor Feed
Friday
Aug232013

JUDGING THE JEWISH PEOPLE FOR DECADES, AFTER HIS P’TIRA 

For roughly two decades after his passing, the body of Rebbi Elazar, son of Rashbi, did not decompose. In fact, he continued to serve as a judge, ruling in actual legal cases, judgments that were carried out in practice. * Source materials compiled by Rabbi Shloma Majeski.

Presented by Boruch Merkur

Rebbi Yehuda HaNasi is noted for having returned to the world post mortem and even being obligated to perform Mitzvos. The following case in the Talmud (Bava Metzia 84b) describes how for roughly two decades after his passing, the body of Rebbi Elazar, son of Rashbi, did not decompose. In fact, he continued to serve as a judge, ruling in actual legal cases, judgments that were carried out in practice:

When Rebbi Elazar b’Rebbi Shimon was dying, he said to his wife: I know that the Rabbis are upset with me and will not properly attend to my burial.* So lay my body in the attic [when I die], and do not be afraid of me.**

Rebbi Shmuel bar Nachmani said: Rebbi Yonasan’s mother related to me that Rebbi Elazar b’Rebbi Shimon’s wife had told her: For at least eighteen years, and up to twenty-two years, I laid his body to rest in the attic. When I went up to the attic I would examine his hair. Wherever a hair would come out, blood would appear.*** One day, however, I saw a worm coming out of his ear and I was disheartened, thinking that perhaps his body was now beginning to decay. My husband appeared to me in a dream and told me: The worm is nothing to worry about. [It is not a sign that my body has begun to rot. Rather, it was a punishment for a particular occurrence.] One day, I heard a disparaging comment about a rabbinical student, and I did not protest as I should have.

[During this period of eighteen to twenty-two years] when two people would come to Rebbi Elazar’s home to be judged, they would stand at the gate of his house and each would state his case. A voice would then emerge from his attic, saying, “So and so, you are liable,” or, “So and so, you are absolved.”

One day Rebbi Elazar’s wife was quarreling with a female neighbor. The neighbor said to her: May you become like your husband, who was not granted burial!

[Hearing of this remark] the Rabbis said: [If Rebbi Elazar’s condition is] so widely known, it is certainly improper [to maintain the status quo; he should be honored with a proper burial].****

There are those who say that Rebbi Shimon bar Yochai appeared to the Rabbis in a dream and told them: I have [only] one fledgling among you, yet you do not wish to bring it to me.***** [As a result] the Rabbis went to attend to Rebbi Elazar’s burial.

NOTES:

*Specifically, he was concerned that they would not inter him in the burial cave of his father, R’ Shimon bar Yochai. This was a valid concern: The Rabbis held that, relative to his saintly father, he was a “wayward son,” and thus undeserving of a place next to him. R’ Elazar the son of R’ Shimon sought to demonstrate to the Rabbis that he was a righteous man and had not departed from his father’s footsteps. He thus chose to remain in his attic, unburied for years, in the hope that his miraculous preservation would change their minds. They would then inter him alongside his father on their own. This is indeed what ultimately happened (Ben Yehoyada ––Note 16 of the Artscroll Schottenstein Edition)

**Maharsha and Maharal both point out that one transgresses a negative commandment by leaving the dead unburied (Sanhedrin 46a). How then could R’ Elazar the son of R’ Shimon have instructed his wife to do just this? They explain that there is an exception to this rule – where the non-internment is for the honor of the deceased (ibid.). Indeed, this was R’ Elazar the son of R’ Shimon’s explicit concern, that the Rabbis would not bury him properly. (Note 17 of the Artscroll Schottenstein Edition)

***I.e., R’ Elazar the son of R’ Shimon’s body did not decompose as corpses usually do. (Maharal ––Note 18 of the Artscroll Schottenstein Edition)

****If people know that he is not alive and yet he has not been buried, this does him no honor. (Rashi) (He must then be buried as soon as possible. His non-internment was permitted only because it dignified him more than internment (see note 17). If he has now become the subject of taunts, then the lack of burial is a dishonor to him.) (Note 20 of the Artscroll Schottenstein Edition).

*****This established that R’ Elazar the son of R’ Shimon was deserving of burial in his father’s cave, a point some Rabbis had disputed (see note 16). There was no longer any reason for R’ Elazar the son of R’ Shimon’s body to remain in the attic. (Note 21 of the Artscroll Schottenstein Edition).

 

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.