MOSHIACH FLOURISHES IN OUR FAITH
November 3, 2015
The Rebbe in #994, Chayei Sara, D'var Malchus

The message here is that the name Tzemach Tzedek expresses the faith of chassidim, the perfect faith of every chassid, that their Rebbefor example, the leader of this generation [“Tzemach is MoshiachforTzemachis numerically equivalent toMenachem’”] – is in fact Moshiach, and if we had merited, the matter would have been fulfilled and manifest outwardly; Moshiach would be visible to the human eye.

לע”נ הרב רחמים ב”ר יואב אנטיאן ע”ה

Translated by Boruch Merkur

10. […] The name “Tzemach Tzedek” alludes to Moshiach Tzidkeinu:

The first part of the name, Tzemach, is the name of Moshiach, as said in the liturgy of Hoshana Rabba, “Ish Tzemach shmo – A man, whose name is Tzemach” (Zecharia 6:12, see Targum; Talmud Yerushalmi Meseches Brachos 4:4; also see Zecharia 3:8). Similarly, the second part of the name, Tzedek, is one of the identifying signs of Moshiach, which is referred to in the prophecy of Yeshayahu (beginning with the words, “A shoot shall spring forth from the stem of Yishai, and a twig shall sprout from his roots” (Yeshaya 11:1)). There it describes Moshiach’s distinction of rendering honest judgment: “He shall judge with tzedek, justly, etc., and tzedek, righteousness, shall be the girdle of his loins” (ibid 11:4-5).

The message here is that the name Tzemach Tzedek expresses the faith of Chassidim, the perfect faith of every Chassid, that their Rebbe – for example, the leader of this generation [see the commentary of Even Ezra on Zecharia 3:8, “Tzemach is Moshiach…for ‘Tzemach’ is numerically equivalent to ‘Menachem’”] – is in fact Moshiach, and if we had merited, the matter would have been fulfilled and manifest outwardly; Moshiach would be visible to the human eye.

11. […] In the preceding farbrengen we spoke at length about how when there is something undesirable in the world (“had we not been worthy”) – at any level of the Seider Hishtalshlus, beginning with the concept of tzimtzum (the contraction of G-dliness) and the Parsa (the Curtain, which conceals G-dliness), Shviras HaKeilim (the investment of Supernal energies into physicality), and so on – it is inconceivable that at its origin it is negative. Rather, it is certain that it derives from a source that is positive and favorable. It is just that after it is subjected to the Hishtalshlus and the varied descents, until it reaches the lowest of all levels, it is possible that something negative should emerge, etc. (“had we not been worthy”).

To further elaborate:

There is nothing in the world that is made of its own; all exists in virtue of G-d. Now, G-d is the essence of goodness, and the nature of the good is benevolence, as the verse states, “The Supernal Voice does not emit…” (the opposite of good). [Thus, all stems from a benevolent, Divine source.] How much more so when we factor in the merit of the Jewish people (“if we had merited”) that there is an advantage and extra benefit beyond what is evinced strictly from the essence of goodness, and the nature of the good to be benevolent – akin to the concept of “havu godel lei’lokeinu.”

How then does this positivity get tainted? If, at a certain time or place, the “vessel” to contain goodness from On High is lacking, or some other similar reason, then it becomes possible that within the manifold hishtalshlus of descending levels, until the lowest of all levels, something contrary or negative may appear (“not found to be worthy”).    

(From the address of the fifth night of Sukkos 5747, bilti muga; Hisvaaduyos 5747, pg. 266-7)

 

Article originally appeared on Beis Moshiach Magazine (http://beismoshiachmagazine.org/).
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