IF G-D IS REVEALED, WHY CAN’T WE SEE HIM
November 15, 2016
The Rebbe in #1044, D'var Malchus, VaYeira

The principal manifestation and revelation of “And G-d appeared to him” will take place with the true and complete redemption through Moshiach Tzidkeinu. But this should not be seen as a remote, distant event…

Translated by Boruch Merkur

Since every single Jew can experience [what is said in the verse regarding Avrohom Avinu], “And G-d appeared to him,” why do they not actually perceive this revelation?

To answer this question from three different angles:

1) It is real even if it is not experienced: First and foremost, not seeing something with one’s physical eyes does not change the reality. There is a well-known parable of the Rebbe Rayatz about scholars who travel on a horse drawn carriage. The scholars speak words of wisdom as they travel while the horses think about the hay, etc. The fact that the only thing on the mind of the horses is hay – that is their reality and all that exists to them (at least at that moment) – doesn’t change the veracity of the topic the scholars are discussing. What they are discussing is real, regardless of how abstract and irrelevant it is to the horses.

2) It is experienced spiritually: The concept of “although he does not see, his mazal sees [“mazal” being a dimension of the soul that transcends the body]” has many applications, one of which is our case. That is, a Jew’s mazal sees the revelation of “And G-d appeared to him.” And as a result of the mazal experiencing this revelation, it also has an impact on that part of the soul that is invested within the body, having a practical effect on the person.

3) It will be experienced in the simple, literal sense in the Messianic Era: The principal manifestation and revelation of “And G-d appeared to him” will take place with the true and complete redemption through Moshiach Tzidkeinu. But this should not be seen as a remote, distant event. In fact, we have the ability to make it happen imminently, for every positive action we do (especially hosting guests, as well as doing acts of kindness regarding spiritual matters) brings the true and complete redemption closer, ushering in and hastening the advent of the time when we will experience the revelation of “And G-d appeared to him.”

Speeding up the redemption is of paramount importance

And since this is so, there is reason to add in disseminating Torah and Judaism and spreading the wellsprings outward with greater strength and greater force, with greater alacrity and a greater sense of urgency, etc., in order to hasten the true and complete redemption. Indeed, speeding up the redemption even a single moment is of paramount importance, because we are speaking about the redemption of all the Jewish people of all generations, as well as the redemption of the Divine Presence Itself.

“And so may it be for us,” that immediately we merit the revelation of “And G-d appeared to him,” with our physical sense of sight. There is a historical precedent for such a powerful revelation taking place in the physical word, as discussed in Tanya (Ch. 36, 46a), “something of this revelation has already been experienced on earth, at the time of the Giving of the Torah,” including a revelation that spanned the globe (in all 127 nations upon which Ester was queen – Ester being the descendant of Sara Imeinu, who lived 127 years), as has been stated, “King of all the land.”

May we immediately experience this revelation with the advent of Moshiach Tzidkeinu. May he come at once and redeem us and take us upright to our land, the Holy Land, to Yerushalayim the Holy City, to the Holy Mountain – “on the mountain, G-d will be seen” (22:14) – immediately!

(From the address of Shabbos Parshas VaYeira, 18 MarCheshvan 5749, muga)

 

Article originally appeared on Beis Moshiach Magazine (http://beismoshiachmagazine.org/).
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