MOSHIACH NOW! THERE’S NO TIME TO CONSULT WITH YOUR SPOUSE 
June 8, 2012
The Rebbe in #836, Arizal, D'var Malchus, Moshiach & Geula, Rebbe

Translated by Boruch Merkur

How is it possible for the concept of “He went and consulted with his wife” to contradict bringing the redemption? According to Torah it is necessary for one to “consult with his wife” about worldly matters!

Woe to us that we did not merit to be redeemed! Had you answered me with one voice that you all wanted to go to Yerushalayim with great joy, all of the Jewish people would have been immediately redeemed. But since you rejected the proposal, the exile has returned to its former strength!The following story appears at the beginning of Shivchei HaArizal and Shivchei HaRav Chaim Vital Zal.

“One time at Erev Shabbos, the time to greet the Shabbos Bride, the Arizal, along with his disciples, went outside the city of Tzfas…in order to receive Shabbos (in accordance with the tradition of Kabbala to go out to the field to receive the Shabbos Queen) … The master asked his disciples: Dear colleagues, do you wish for us to go to Yerushalayim before Shabbos and make Shabbos there?

“The distance to Yerushalayim from Tzfas is more that 25 parsaos [i.e., more than 70 miles]. Some of the disciples said that they would like to go, but others said: First let us go tell our wives, as stated in the Talmud (Brachos 27b): ‘He went and consulted with his wife.’ (It was no wonder to them that the Arizal should make a suggestion that was contingent upon a miracle taking place, in order for them to arrive [in Yerushalayim on time for Shabbos]; they merely wanted to ask permission from their wives to be away from home over Shabbos.)

“Upon hearing their request to first go home, the master was stricken with great apprehension. Clapping his hands together in anguish he said: Woe to us that we did not merit to be redeemed! Had you answered me with one voice that you all wanted to go to Yerushalayim with great joy, all of the Jewish people would have been immediately redeemed. But since you rejected the proposal, the exile has returned to its former strength in the world.”

HOW CAN FOLLOWING A HALACHA DELAY THE REDEMPTION?!

Now, since this story is part of Torah, it certainly contains a lesson in serving G-d. For at first glance, it is difficult to understand how it is possible for the concept of “He went and consulted with his wife” to contradict bringing the redemption. According to Torah it is actually necessary for one to “consult with his wife” about worldly matters. This is especially so with regard to Shabbos, for the entire concept of Shabbos candles is for the sake of peace between husband and wife. And there are several other obligations particular to Shabbos pertaining to husband and wife. How then can something that is entirely in accordance with Torah, and based on the code of Jewish law, deter the redemption?

ACT FIRST, 
QUESTION LATER

According to nigla, the revealed dimension of the Torah, the answer is follows.

The Gemara states (Eruvin 67a): “With regard to a Rabbinic ruling, we must first act on the ruling and only then may we question it.” But at first glance, if it is something that is questionable, how can one simply act on it in blind obedience?

The explanation is that it is necessary to know that the Sages are great scholars and they can be relied upon in directing our actions. The fact that one has a difficulty with what they say, this is only because he has not truly applied himself in delving into the Torah. Were he to properly toil in Torah, and he is meritorious, he will determine that the law is indeed as the Sages have ruled.

In the case at hand, when the disciples heard an instruction from the Arizal, who [in addition to being a genius in the mystical dimension of the Torah] was a master of the revealed aspect of Torah (as stated in Likkutei Torah (and Taamei HaMitzvos) of Rabbi Chaim Vital), they should have known that they can rely upon him that he would not cause them to be ensnared, G-d forbid, in doing something that is contrary to Torah law.

A CALL FOR HISKASHRUS

From a deeper perspective:

It is one thing to consider the veracity of a ruling; quite another to stage an outright attack…

It is impossible to bring Moshiach in this manner – that when one hears a ruling, he takes out the Shulchan Aruch and approaches the rabbi, who has the authority to render judgments and rulings, and asks him the meaning of the Be’er Heitev commentary on the topic – does it not contradict the ruling he was just given? Moshiach cannot be brought in this manner.

One needs to have hiskashrus and kabbalas ol (faith in and devotion to his Rebbe, and acceptance of his words and instructions). One must comply with the rulings of the Sages without any calculations at all. This is the quality that characterizes a soldier – that he makes no calculations at all. To a soldier, nothing exists other than the commander and his orders.

Were he to scrutinize the words of his Rebbe, G-d forbid, this illustrates that he is lacking in hiskashrus. And when he is lacking in hiskashrus, he is lacking in unity, lacking in [what is stated in “Sim Shalom,” the concluding section of the Shmoneh Esrei prayer] “kulanu k’echad – all of us as one,” and consequently he is likewise lacking in the blessings enumerated there [i.e., “peace, goodness, and blessing, life, grace and benevolence and mercy”]. Regarding those things that are under the authority of the Sages, first and foremost what is required is hiskashrus and kabbalas ol (“we must first act on the ruling and only then may we question it”).

(From the address of Shabbos Parshas Shmini 5718, bilti muga)

 

Article originally appeared on Beis Moshiach Magazine (http://beismoshiachmagazine.org/).
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